1) 9th Workshop on Catastrophic Disruption in the Solar System. May 14 - 17, 2018, Kobe

9th Workshop on Catastrophic Disruption in the Solar System (CD9)

Date: May 14 - 17, 2018
Venue: Ikuta shrine (Ikuta Jinja Kaikan), Sannomiya, Kobe, Japan

http://www.impact-res.org/CD2018/Catastrophic_Disruption_2018/Welcome.html


IMPORTANT DATES:

Abstract submission and registration open: Jan. 9, 2018
Deadline for abstract submission and application for early registration: Feb. 28, 2018
Final deadline for application of registration, and excursion & banquet: April 9, 2018


PRELIMINARY PROGRAM:

CD9 will take place over 3 and 1/2 days, with both morning and afternoon sessions on May 14, 15 and 17, and a morning session on May 16. The program will include both invited and contributed talks divided across the following four research areas:

1- Observations and Missions
2- Experiments and Scaling Laws
3- Simulations/Modeling
4- Meteorites

Invited speakers are:
Jean-Baptiste Vincent (DLR, Germany)
Kevin Walsh (SwRI, USA)
Andy Cheng (APL/JHU, USA)
Desiree Cotto-Figueroa (Univ. Puerto Rico)
Masahiko Arakawa (Kobe Univ., Japan)
Angela Stickle (APL/JHU, USA)
Megan Burk-Syal (LLNL, USA)
Nicole Lunning (Smithsonian Inst., USA)
Guy Libourel (Obs. Cote d'Azur, France)

Since we want to leave enough time for discussions, there may be more abstracts submitted than can be accommodated as talks. For authors of abstracts which are accepted but not selected to give contributed talks, electronic posters (one page, PDF format) will be requested. These posters will be put on the workshop website during the workshop for discussion. In addition, there will be a time slot in the program for three-minute oral presentations for the presenters of these posters.


ABSTRACTS AND REGISTRATION:

Abstracts submission and registration will have to be done by the online tool linked from the meeting website. Upon submission, the participant should create an ID account, log in the registration site of the workshop, and fill the registration application form and abstract submission form on the web site. More details will be available on the web site (CD9 web > Abstracts & Registration) at the time of the opening of abstract submission and registration.

The SOC will make decisions on abstract acceptance and will notify the decision by March 9, 2018. The program will be available by the end of March.

If the number of participants exceeds the capacity of the workshop (about 75 participants) at or after the deadline of the early registration, we will close the registration before April 9.


PAYMENT:

No payment is required at the time of application for registration.
Participants should pay the registration fee by cash in Japanese yen at on-site registration. The LOC won’t accept credit card nor foreign currency.

Rates for professionals are:
Early registration rate: 12,000 JPY (until Feb 28, 2018, JST)
Late registration rate: 15,000 JPY (after Feb. 28 and until April 9, 2018, JST)

Rates for students are:
Early registration rate: 8,000 JPY (until Feb 28, 2018, JST)
Late registration fee will be 10,000 JPY (after Feb. 28 and until April 9, 2018, JST)

Registration for professionals & students includes admission to scientific sessions, meeting materials, beverage and refreshments during sessions and breaks, and admission to the Sunday ice breaker at Center for Planetary Science (CPS), Kobe University.
The registration fee DOES NOT include the fee of excursion & banquet.

The rate for excursion & banquet for registered professionals and students is 12,000 JPY.

The rate for accompanying person is 12,000 JPY for the three social events and admission to the venue.

On-site registration is available on the evening of Sunday, May 13 at CPS, and from Monday, May 14 to Thursday, May 17 at the venue.


SOCIAL EVENTS:

There will be an excursion and two evening social events for all CD9 Workshop participants and their registered accompanying persons.

Sunday evening, May 13: Ice breaker - at CPS located in the Port Island.

Wednesday afternoon, May 16: Excursion - Bus tour to Himeji Castle. Himeji castle is an old beautiful castle. It is one of the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Japan.

Wednesday evening, May 16: Banquet - A dinner cruise to enjoy the illumination of Kobe city and a long suspension bridge, Akashi Kaikyo Bridge.

TRAVEL:

There are direct flights to Kansai Airport (KIX) from abroad. If you land on Tokyo/Narita first, you can fly to either Kobe Airport (UKB), Osaka Airport (ITM), or Kansai Airport (KIX). You can also come by trains; a local train to the Tokyo Station and a super-express train (Shinkansen) from Tokyo to the Shin-Kobe Station. The expected time from the airports and the Shin-Kobe station to downtown Kobe (Sannomiya) are:

From KIX terminal 1: 65 min. by Airport Limousine (1,950 JPY)
From UKB: 30 min. by Port Liner (330 JPY)
From ITM: 40 min. by Airport Limousine (1,050 JPY)
From Shin-Kobe Sta.: 20 min. by walk (subway, taxi, and local bus are also available)


ACCOMODATION AND OTHER INFORMATION:

Available in the 1st circular.
http://www.impact-res.org/CD2018/Catastrophic_Disruption_2018/Welcome_files/1st_announcement.html

Contact: Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

SOC:
Neyda Abreu (Pen State University, USA) and
Patrick Michel (Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Nice, France), co-Chairs
Erik Asphaug (University of Arizona, USA)
Bobby Bus (University of Hawaii, USA)
Adriano Campo Bagatin (Universidad de Alicante, Spain)
Dan Durda (Southwest Research Institute, Boulder CO, USA)
Kevin Housen (University of Washington, USA)
Akiko Nakamura (Kobe University, Japan)

LOC :
Akiko Nakamura (Kobe University), Chair
Masahiko Arakawa (Kobe University)
Naoyuki Hirata (Kobe University)
Keiji Ohtsuki (Kobe University)
Fumihiko Usui (Kobe University)
Minami Yasui (Kobe University)

This workshop is supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Core-to-Core Program "International Network of Planetary Sciences”, and CPS of Kobe University.


2) poste de DR2 en section 4, avec possibilité  de recrutement externe, pour le GSMA, Reims

(http://www.univ-reims.fr/gsma/).

La thématique de la section 4 - Atomes et molécules, optique et lasers,
plasmas chauds - inclut explicitement la spectroscopie atomique et
moléculaire appliquée à l'astrophysique. Ce concours peut donc concerner
des candidats produisant une recherche à l'intersection des thématiques
de la section 4 et des activités de planétologie du GSMA (atmosphères
planétaires et exoplanètes).

Pour information:
* Site de la section 4:
  http://www.cnrs.fr/comitenational/sections/section.php?sec=04
* Site du concours :
  http://gestionoffres.dsi.cnrs.fr/fo/offres/detail-fr.php?&offre_id=9
* Site du GSMA :
  http://www.univ-reims.fr/gsma
* Equipe planétologie du GSMA:
  https://planeto.univ-reims.fr/

Contacts :
Directeur du GSMA / Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.
Groupe planétologie / Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.


3) EGU 2018 Extraterrestrial Seismology Session - 8-13 April 2018, in Vienna

This session discusses advances in seismic instrumentation and seismological methodology aimed at investigating terrestrial planets, icy moons, and small bodies.

We welcome contributions presenting (1) robust and low-power seismic instrumentation adequate for space, including new deployment and sensor concepts: miniaturization, rotational sensors, or sensors for atmospheric recordings of seismic waves; (2) seismological methods adaptable to cases of limited data availability or harsh conditions on extraterrestrial bodies: dealing with single-station setups, scarce networks, strong background noise, lack of meta-deta etc.; (3) insights obtained from previous and recent missions such as Apollo and Rosetta, preparations for seismic data processing of the InSight mission to Mars, as well as simulations of seismic experiments on asteroids, comets, icy moons etc.

We especially invite contributions presenting seismological experiments in challenging, i.e. analogue terrestrial environments, e.g. experiments on (floating) ice, in the oceans, or in deserts.

Please consider submitting an abstract to the session PS5.3/SM1.03
https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2018/session/28537
The abstract submission deadline is 10 Jan 2018, 13:00 CET.

Best regards,
Stefanie Hempel, Brigitte Knapmeyer-Endrun, Martin Knapmeyer, Savas Ceylan, Simon C. Stähler


4) Research Associate in Planetary Physics, Imperial College London, deadline 10 January 2018

please find below an opportunity at ICL:

Research Associate in Planetary Physics, Imperial College London.
Closes: 10th January 2018
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BGJ963/research-associate-in-planetary-physics


5) ESLAB-52 Symposium "Comparative aeronomy and plasma environment of terrestrial planets", 14-18 May, 2018, ESTEC

we would like to remind you about the ESLAB 52 symposium
Comparative aeronomy and plasma environment of terrestrial planets
to be held on 14-18 May 2018 at ESTEC/ ESA in Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

Below you can find description of the symposium.
In the beginning of January we will open the web site and call for abstracts
with submission deadline in the beginning of February. We will inform you accordingly.

We would like to strongly encourage you to participate in the symposium.
Please distribute this message among your colleagues working in the field.
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year !

Dima Titov and Bruce Jakosky
Convenors of the Symposium
_____________________________________________

ESLAB-52 Symposium
Comparative aeronomy and plasma environment of terrestrial planets
14-18 May 2018, ESTEC/ ESA, Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

Processes in the upper atmospheres, ionospheres and magnetospheres of terrestrial
planets and their interactions with the solar wind are of great importance for our understanding
of atmospheric losses to space and evolution of climates. Spacecraft observations
at Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan, as well as Moon, Mercury and other atmosphere-less bodies
provided a wealth of data that allow characterization of  the processes in all their diversity
and in a comparative manner. The wide range of boundary conditions found in the Solar System
provides tremendous input into understanding evolution of the atmospheres of exoplanets
as driven by aeronomy processes.

The symposium will address the processes in the upper atmospheres and plasma envelopes
of all terrestrial planets, including escape and atmospheric evolution.
The experimental results from MAVEN, Mars Express, Venus Express, Pioneer-Venus, Cluster, Swarm, Messenger
and other space missions will form the basis of the symposium programme.
They will be complemented by results from theoretical investigations and numerical modelling.
The symposium will be organized with 5 days of sessions that will include invited summary talks,
oral presentations, poster sessions and discussions.


6) Virginia Initiative on Cosmic Origins (VICO): Postdoc positions

We are pleased to announce the new Virginia Initiative on Cosmic Origins (VICO) that, with Eric Herbst and others, we are helping to set up at the University of Virginia. Please see

http://cosmicorigins.space/

for more information.

There are three or more Cosmic Origins postdoctoral fellowships (Jan. 15th deadline) being advertised as part of this initiative, including fellowships in partnership with Chalmers and MPE:

https://jobregister.aas.org/ad/c0b0a45b

We expect there will be workshops and conferences hosted by VICO in the coming years and we look forward to welcoming you to Charlottesville in the near future!

Best regards,

Jonathan Tan


7) Call for abstracts at the AOGS 2018, 3-8 June, Hawaii

we invite you to submit abstracts to the following sessions taking place at the upcoming AOGS 2018 (June 3-8, 2018) in Hawaii.


The abstract submission deadline is 19 January 2018.

More information can be found on the AOGS website:
http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2018/public.asp?page=home.htm


PS6: Magnetospheres, Atmospheres, Exospheres of Outer Planets and Their Satellites

This session welcomes papers about magnetospheres, atmospheres, exospheres of outer planets and their satellites with special emphasis on observations (both from space and from the ground), modelling, and theoretical interpretation. Abstracts on satellite interactions with their neutral and charged environments, supporting laboratory investigations and concepts for future spacecraft missions and investigations are also relevant to this session. We especially welcome papers about the Cassini mission Grand Finale time period as well as results from the most recent Juno data.

Conveners:
Dr. Norbert Krupp (Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Germany), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

Dr. Linda Spilker (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, United States), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.
Dr. Scott Bolton (Southwest Research Institute, United States), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser. 

Prof. Sushil Atreya (University of Michigan, United States),Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

PS16 : Cassini’s Grand Finale Science Highlights and Discoveries

Session Description The Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn ended in a dramatic plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere on September 15, 2017 sending back in-situ data as long as possible.  The final year of the mission included 20 Ring-Grazing orbits just outside the rings and a series of 22 highly inclined “Grand Finale” orbits with closest approach between the innermost D ring and Saturn’s upper atmosphere.  The final 22 orbits enabled the opportunity for unique science observations including: probing of gravitational and magnetic field moments to higher order and precision; determining the ring mass; in-situ sampling of the plasma environment, upper atmosphere and exosphere; and imaging both Saturn and rings at high resolution. Already data obtained on these orbits have led to surprising initial results. We propose a multi-disciplinary session to report on analysis and modeling of data collected during this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore Saturn up close and personal.

Conveners:
Dr. Scott Edgington (Jet Propulsion Lab / California Institute of Technology, United States), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.
Prof. Sushil Atreya (University of Michigan, United States), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser. 

Dr. Athena Coustenis (Paris Observatory, France), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.
Dr. Wing-Huen Ip (National Central University, Taiwan), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

 

PS18 : Understanding Icy Worlds, Ocean Worlds, and Habitability

This session will be devoted to understanding icy worlds in the outer solar system, including those containing subsurface oceans, their possible analogues around other stars, and their associated processes and geochemistry that might enable them to support life. The session will include solicited and contributed presentations addressing observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies relevant to past, ongoing, and future missions.

Relevant subtopics include:
(1) interior structure, composition, and thermal evolution,
(2) surface geology and composition,
(3) orbital dynamics and tidal interactions

Conveners:
Dr. Steven Vance (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, United States) Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

Dr. Frank Sohl (German Aerospace Center (DLR), Germany) Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser. 

Dr. Athena Coustenis (Paris Observatory, France), Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.
Dr. Mathieu Choukroun (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, United States) Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.
Dr. Jun Kimura (Osaka University, Japan) Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

PS22: Field and Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Infrared Remote Sensing
This session will highlight the importance of comprehensive analog studies towards understanding planetary remote sensing datasets, with a focus on the near infrared and thermal infrared. Contributions that probe the links between the small-scale of laboratory (microns to millimeters) and ground/airborne field (centimeters to meters) measurement to the large-scale (10s meters to kilometers) in remote sensing observations to better interpret the dynamics, chemistry, composition, thermophysics, and physical properties of surfaces and atmospheres are encouraged. This session is open to a diverse range of planetary bodies, including Mercury, Venus, Moon, NEOs, Mars, Martian Moons, MBOs, Trojans, Gas Giants, Ice Giants, Icy Satellites, Irregular Satellites, and Plutoids. New developments of instrumentation and techniques used in field and laboratory studies are also welcome.